THE WAY IT WAS...

​​​Reflections on “One Day’s Work” reprinted from the December 2008 newsletter, page 1  by Yard Sale Chairperson Clel Shore

    People say we did well for a day’s work, so I will give a little background about our fourth annual yard sale. Thanks to all that helped, worked, sang, played the guitar, cooked, drank, baked, shopped, sold, painted and posted signs, marked prices, donated, sat, ate, delivered, hauled in, and hauled away.
Carol Mahler wrote an article for the newspaper and made three trips to Winter Haven to drag furniture and stuff from a friend’s home.  Leonard Higley worked months in his yard and clearing out his barn for our storage. When things were delivered to his back porch, he and Kay had to carry everything to the barn and then drag it out to price. A week before the sale, Leonard put out tables and covered them with tarps. He uncovered them every day so we could put out more stuff, and he put the tables away at the end.
 Thanks to Jack Welch, I talked on the radio a month before the sale asking for donations and then twice more to ask people to come and buy.  We have someone that picks up all the stuff that is left over, folds the tarps, and cleans up the yard, so that at the end of the day, all is done. They had people in Nocatee whose house had burned . . . .
    So, the rest of the story: "for one day’s work" we made $1800!

   ANNUAL YARD SALE - every November 

In 2005, the DeSoto County Historical Society held its first annual Yard Sale at the home of Betty and Paul Brown who lived on Tangelo Street just west of Airport Avenue.  Carol Mahler did a bake sale with coffee available, too.  
    In 2006, the yard sale moved to the Historic Parker House Bed and Breakfast Inn, the home of members Kay and Leonard Higley, a great location on W. Hickory Street.  Clel Shore worked as chairperson of the event, and she and the Higleys provided “pick up” for donations. The Higleys also allowed us to collect donations on their back porch (and later in a tarp-covered trailer in their yard), and they stored donations in their “barn.” We had live music during the sale, and in addition to selling baked treats, we also sold cold drinks and hotdogs that Leonard grilled.

    In 2011, after Kay and Leonard Higley moved to North Port, the Society moved the sale to the DeSoto Fair Grounds Exhibition Building, and it became the indoor yard sale that it is today.  Marty Dow grilled hotdogs—as did the Boy Scouts one year—and we had fantastic bake sales coordinated by June Sowell.    Initially we tried to collect donations on the porch of the John Morgan Ingraham House and then in a donation wagon alongside the Ingraham Seed House, but some of these items walked away. We are grateful to Bebe Bradbury and Donn Jackson for storing the donations in their barn then and every year since.  The yard sale takes five days of work to price and set up and a lot of volunteers but is a highlight of our year.

Clel Shore at Parker House yard sale

shoppers at current yard sale at Fairgrounds

2016 Yard Sale
The Historic Society had another successful Yard Sale.
Thanks to so many who helped make this year’s sale a success and made the hard work easier than ever.  A record number of members and friends turned out to work setting up,  during, and tearing down.  Publicity was the best and the bake sale was a great addition.   I am so proud of each and every one of you who helped.  THANK YOU,  Norma Banas, chair